Video Lesson: Finals (an en ang eng ong) (Newbie, Module 1)

Lesson Information
  Instructor: Ellie Length: 06:13
  Knowledge Point: Finals: an, en, ang, eng and ong (Newbie, Module 1)
  Related Lessons
How are you, I'm fine, are you busy, how do you use these greetings in daily life? Don't miss this online lesson about Chinese tones and Pinyin. What's more, you'll learn five more finals (an, en, ang, eng, ong). Also, more information on the tonal modification rule of the third tone will be introduced.
Taibangle says
Zen3 me dian4 li3 dou1 mei2 ren2 a ? :) Gen1 ni3 kai1 wan2 xiao4 de le
Wo3 shi4 xiang3 ne.....cao3 mei2 ka1 fei1 dou4 nai3 :)....zen3 me yang2 ?
gan3 kuai4 he1 yi1 kou3 shi4 shi4 kan4 a 
Okay.....what do have to say here...Dongyu Beta, Well....it's great to be here tonight
first of all I think I forgot that rule......If a third tone is followed by first tone, second tone, fourth tone and neutral tone. Good review, but too quick !!!! Could be expanded on, explained a little more ....please.  I did like how you used both hen leng in the same sentence so we could hear the differences.  I still think you could do more here in these lessons.  How so Taibangle1, you say :)
By having sentences that have the finals you covered in this module. Like this.....
Zhei4 zhang1 zuo1zi hen3 zhong4. You have the ang sound the en sound plus the ong sound all finals covered in this module. what do you think?
Or we could be asked to say the sentence after you say it...
Dong1 bian1 you3 chang2 jiang1...ong final , ang final again, see what I mean....jelly bean ! 0(-_-)0
You could even use this sentence to further explain, reinforce or teach us about these important finals....
Zhang1 kai1 zui3 chi1 dian3 tang2 guo3
As you probably are wondering why I look at this segment of your online class so much.
Because here is the foundation...here is where we can learn so much....especially our listening skills.
If we can only speak but can't understand the tones, initials/finals coming at us in a simple conversation how can we improve. I think this portion "Pinyin " is very important needs to be considered alot . Most of these video's where made a long time ago....they could be updated. There is not real postings as far as like or dislike.  The level of involvement here could be higher and draw in more students to comment on this portion of your program. Nothing negative. Just from my mistakes and learning I see how maybe pinyin is kinda of just rushed through in most online classes even some classrooms. 
 
July 3, 2013 Reply
Ramyrez23 says
Hi,
I'm a french man who learn chinese on english laguage, a good way to perfect my english while learning a new language.
My question is : what about if we have three tones followed one by each other :

We saw that " Third Third " become " Second Third "
What about "Third Third Third " ?
Is it " Second Second Third " ?
December 26, 2011 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to Ramyrez23
Good question! For three third tones together, we have three types, I will exemplify them.
The first type is when the first two terms form a set or word, such as in “zhǎnlǎn guǎn” exhibition centre. In this phrase, “zhǎn” and “lǎn” are right next to each other, and are actually a set or word, they mean exhibition, so the third tone of the first and second terms “zhǎn” and “lǎn” should be changed into the second tone, the other term keeps the third tone. This kind of phrase, we should read using “second second third” tone pronunciation. For example “xǐzǎo shuǐ” bath water.
The second type is when none of the terms form a set or word such as in 999 “jiǔjiǔjiǔ.” In this phrase none of the terms form a set or word and therefore, the first and second “9” should be read as second tones. This kind of phrase, just like the first type, we should read using “second second third” tone pronunciation.
The third type is when the last two terms form a set or word such as in “hěn yǒnggǎn” very brave. In this phrase, “yǒnggǎn” means brave, they form a set or word, so “yǒng” should be changed into second tone, “hěn” and “gǎn” keep the third tone. This kind of phrase, we should read using “third second third” tone pronunciation. For example “zhǐlǎohǔ”paper tiger.
Maybe these rules are a little bit difficult for you. Do more practice, you will get them all.
January 4, 2012 Reply
Ramyrez23 in reply to Ellie_Chinese teacher
ok, 谢谢。
January 5, 2012 Reply
Ranonyana says
I study Chinese pinyin and I'm having some troubles with the Chinese tones. I'm especially off with the second tone. Is there some variation in the way Chinese tones are actually pronounced when speaking?
August 1, 2011 Reply
Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) in reply to Ranonyana
I'm especially off with the second tone. Is there some variation in the way Chinese tones are actually pronounced when speaking?
For Chinese tones, we use five degrees or levels to mark the pitch of syllables. The pitch increases from one (lowest) to five (highest). 
The pitch of the first tone is high and flat at level five. It is slightly shorter in duration than the second tone. The pitch of the second tone rises from level three to level five. It is shorter in duration than the third tone. The pitch of the third tone falls from level two down to level one and then rises back up to level four. It is like a curve. It is the longest in duration among the four tones. The pitch of the fourth tone falls from five down to one. It is the shortest in duration among the four tones. 
For the variation in Chinese tones, a third one, when immediately followed by another 
third tone, should be pronounced in the second tone, e.g. nǐ hǎo→ní hǎo.
August 1, 2011 Reply
db gurung in reply to Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher)
ni hao 
May 19, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to db gurung
db gurung ni hao!
May 29, 2012 Reply
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