Video Lesson: Review (Newbie, Module 3)

Lesson Information
  Instructor: Ellie Length: 07:05
  Knowledge Point: Review of Pinyin System  (Newbie, Module 3)
  Related Lessons
Review all initials, finals and tones of Chinese Pinyin introduced in previous lessons. Along with exercises, you will also review phrases and vocabulary covered throughout this course. Learn the poems A Spring Morning from the Tang Dynasty and Climbing the Guanque Tower. Get more Pinyin practice with two tongue twisters.
Taibangle says
En4 wo3 xiang3 yi2 xia1.....I just watched the "Tongue Twister " video but there was not place to reply. That format used in teaching us it's content is the best so far. I have watched pinyin video's for a week. Today will be my last and I will move on to something else :)
I like how it test you knowledge and if you miss an answer it gives you the option to review, or be tested again and see the correct answer in not just pinyin but simplified/traditional. The tongue twister part where she speaks could of been done just a little slower so you can follow her along :) a few times. Then of course the fun part is to try and say it fast.
Yes...speaking chinese is like singing, huh? with all those tonal changes. Ting1 ni3 chang4 ge1...zhen1 de hen3 ai chang2 de
My first week here has been fun....I like this very much exploring, learning and trying out your site. Cool  ....Did you say "Ni3 jue2 de OK ma?  heheheh.......  man2 hao3 de, man2 hao3 de !!!!
Jie1 xia4 lai2  ne, xiang3 qu4 na3li3 ? I have to look around....Ok Like Indiana Jones your site is an adventure :) 
July 7, 2013 Reply
Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) in reply to Taibangle
Hi Tangbangle,

As for the "Tongue Twister " video, could you let me know the name of the lesson? Do you mean you couldn’t reply to others’ comments?
Also, we want to tell you congratulations! Since you have finished Pinyin videos, how about uploading your recordings and share with us what you have learned?  :)
July 10, 2013 Reply
Budman51 says
This was a really great Pinyin lesson!  I 'm deaf in right ear and hearing impaired in other and I still have some trouble with 2nd and 4th tones.. but I'm getting it.. btw.. I took a lesson in 2010 online with Skype and could not learn that way..even though you have awesome teachers...but this is great.. there's no internet lag and you still have great teachers!  good job echinese  online!!!
March 28, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to Budman51
Dear Budman51, I am so glad to know our lessons are helped! Hope you can continue your Chinese learning with our programme. If you have any question on our lessons, feel free to let me know!
March 31, 2012 Reply
hikehawk says
Man!!! Wished I had paid better attention back in my mandrin class school days!!! I'm Asian, and can hardly say my own name in Chinese!!! What an embarrassment!  But...this course on Pinyin is slowly helping me bit by bit...to redeem what had been lost aeons ago!!!

It was a tuffie for me..
February 8, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to hikehawk
Hi,hikehawk, I'm glad hear that our videos can help you to learn Chinese. If you have any questions,please feel free let me know.
By the way, would you mind if you tell me your Chinese name?
February 10, 2012 Reply
hikehawk in reply to Ellie_Chinese teacher
Ni hao, Elli...My chinese name is LIAN BOON HIN (pronounced as "Lian Wen Sing").  I would llike to know how it is written in Mandrin.  Can you help??

Xie Xie!!
February 11, 2012 Reply
hikehawk in reply to hikehawk
Hi ellie..I got my chinese name written to me...Thank you..
February 11, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to hikehawk
Hi, Lian Wen Sing. Can you write your Chinese name to me?
February 14, 2012 Reply
hikehawk in reply to Ellie_Chinese teacher
hi ellie...how do I write my name in Chinese? I don't have the program to write in chinese...Actually, my name in Singapore is written and spelled as "Lian Boon Hin"...but it is pronounced as "Lian Wen Sing" in Mandrin...I prefer "Lian Wen Sing"...so sweet like a flower song!
February 14, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to hikehawk
Yeah... I think so. It's a good name.  ^_^
February 14, 2012 Reply
budaki56 says
My main problem is memorizing the finals like the way each sound and pronouncing the very similar initials like x//j/q and z/c/s. are there any exercises I should do to help articulate those similar sounds not found in English or should I just keep doing the ones at the end of each lesson? my tones could use a little bit of work as well. 
February 2, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to budaki56
Hi,budaki56  Maybe you only memorize these finals have a little bit difficult. I can give you some Chinese word help you remember them. "j"in "jī"is chicken, "q" in "qī" is seven, "x" in "xī"is west, "z"in"zì"is character, "c"in "cí"is word, "s"in"sì"is four. And you should  keep doing the ones at the end of each lesson, I think you can make progress.
Or you can upload your recording on our website, show me you pronunciation, I will help you correct it.
February 10, 2012 Reply
hikehawk in reply to Ellie_Chinese teacher
Ay!!! Wo putong the pronouciations...A little hard for me...
February 11, 2012 Reply
Ellie_Chinese teacher in reply to hikehawk
Don't worry! "C" is same to "ts" in "nuts". 
"Z" is same to "ds" in "needs".
 "S" is same to "s" in "sleep". 
"J" is similar to "j"  in "jeep".
"Q" is similar to "ch" in "cheese".
"X" is similar to "sh" in "ship".
The only difference is that when you pronounce the "j,q,x" the surface of the tongue need to touch the hard palate, and the tongue tip should touches the back of the lower teeth. 
February 14, 2012 Reply
Ranonyana says
Are there any rules about the position of tone marks in Mandarin Chinese?
August 1, 2011 Reply
Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) in reply to Ranonyana
There are mainly three rules about the position of Mandarin pinyin tone marks:
1) The Mandarin pinyin tone marks should be put above a vowel if there is only one vowel in a syllable. For example: mā, pí, bà.
2) The Mandarin pinyin tone mark should be put above the main vowel, if a syllable contains two or more vowels. For example: māo, mēi, kǒu.
3) The Mandarin pinyin tone mark should be put above the latter vowel if a syllable contains a final “iu” or “ui.” For example: diū, guī.
Another way to remember it:
If the syllable contain the vowel “a,” the Mandarin tone mark should be put on “a;” If there isn’t an “a,” we put tone marks on “o” or “e.” When “i” and “u” are in the same syllable, we put tone marks on the later one.
August 1, 2011 Reply
hikehawk in reply to Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher)
Easy enough to remember...This is the BEST ONLINE CHINESE MANDRIN I HAVE EVER FOUND!!! The MOST FUN TO LEARN TOO!!!
February 10, 2012 Reply
hikehawk in reply to Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher)
Ni hao, Ranonyana...a suggestion, may I?  Copy the entire text that Helen Zhang gave you, and put in in your NOTES....In this case, you can always review over and over again until it becomes part of your life...
February 10, 2012 Reply
Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) in reply to hikehawk
Hi hikehawk,
That was a good suggestion. There is a Notes Tab in every lesson, and you can put anything in it you may need to review later in your notes. And all notes will be shown in your Chinese center. So it is easier for you to review all learning points. I’m so glad that all of us can share the Chinese learning experience. Well done! Let’s make progress together.
February 10, 2012 Reply
Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher) in reply to hikehawk
Hi hikehawk,
Thank you for your support. I’m glad that you love our lessons. Just enjoy our video lessons and grow with us.
February 10, 2012 Reply
hikehawk in reply to Helen Zhang (Chinese Teacher)
Definitely...I will become a member when my 7 day trial is over...!!
February 11, 2012 Reply
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